Recent comments

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Essentially, the material in the Tapestry Saga was adventure based. It described plots and characters and drew on existing material as to where these adventures took place.

    The series of adventures were deliberately written over a 20 year period. This was mailnly due to a discussion that was held in the early design stage that came to the opinion that characters in most RPGs have an incredible amount of adventures in a short time frame. Of course, this is artificially generated by the game and the characters wanting to keep the adventure going. Nobody wants to look after their farm holdings for 5 years or so after slaying a few dragons.

    In keeping with the more believable environment of Harn, we wanted the GM to take a guiding hand and, when one part of the saga was complete, the players would be told that x years have gone by, before introducing hooks into the next part of the adventure. We were even devising a set of tables to generate character-related events that happened during the period of down-time.

    As Robin points out, an adventure, by its very nature must be able to progress beyond 720. The Tapestry material did not create new historical events or generate new Gods etc. It drew off existing canon. However, in any game a GM and/or the players may be responsible for generating major changes in the world. That becomes their own personal verion of Harn (I think Robin refers to these as p-Harns).

    On another note, while developing the Tapestry series, it was hoped that we would be able to add in a few 'easter eggs' drawn from material that Robin has not released. A few new things to whet the appetite of fans. But...alas, corporate problems arose and the Harn project was abandonned. I was moved on to d20 modules for another year or so before Auran decided it didn't need creative writers anymore - just programmers and artists.

    Regards,

    Keith

  • Right to bear arms in Chelemby   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Dan and Peter

    What you have both raised and discussed sounds about right.

    Chélemby is an evolving cultural mixture, so it has elements of Ivínian and southwestern 'feudal' culture.

    On the nalâri (freeholds), the rights (and responsibilities!) regarding bearing arms will be dictated by the válhakâr (clandhead) and the thrángaad (ruling council), much as Peter has suggested. Generally, members of a tia-nalári (noble) clan will expect to be able to bear some arms; but you would only expect the válhakâr, their immediate circle (the 'válhakøren') and the husgâranen (huscarls) to be significantly armed most of the time.

    In the towns, in the national reserve (wilderness) and on the royal highways, the rule of the Nálstrad (parliament) and the Crown apply, as Daniel has suggested, and probably in the way he has suggested.

    Cheers

    Jeremy

    ---------------------
    Fástred al Beréma,
    Rówanti al Sávè-k’nôr

  • Right to bear arms in Chelemby   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Dan and Peter

    What you have both raised and discussed sounds about right.

    Chélemby is an evolving cultural mixture, so it has elements of Ivínian and southwestern 'feudal' culture.

    On the nalâri (freeholds), the rights (and responsibilities!) regarding bearing arms will be dictated by the válhakâr (clandhead) and the thrángaad (ruling council), much as Peter has suggested. Generally, members of a tia-nalári (noble) clan will expect to be able to bear some arms; but you would only expect the válhakâr, their immediate circle (the 'válhakøren') and the husgâranen (huscarls) to be significantly armed most of the time.

    In the towns, in the national reserve (wilderness) and on the royal highways, the rule of the Nálstrad (parliament) and the Crown apply, as Daniel has suggested, and probably in the way he has suggested.

    Cheers

    Jeremy

    ---------------------
    Fástred al Beréma,
    Rówanti al Sávè-k’nôr

  • Right to bear arms in Chelemby   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Thanks, Peter, that is helpful. As I've previously focussed nearly all my attention on Kaldor, the different social structure of Chelemby will take some getting used to.

    I imagine that in places under Nastrad (or is it royal) authority, ie, Chelemby city, Koladis and Evanekin, there are certain conventions on bearing arms that are followed? Presumably the clanheads and their house guards would be allowed the full range of arms, whereas for most other folk there would be limits?

    Dan.

  • Right to bear arms in Chelemby   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Thanks, Peter, that is helpful. As I've previously focussed nearly all my attention on Kaldor, the different social structure of Chelemby will take some getting used to.

    I imagine that in places under Nastrad (or is it royal) authority, ie, Chelemby city, Koladis and Evanekin, there are certain conventions on bearing arms that are followed? Presumably the clanheads and their house guards would be allowed the full range of arms, whereas for most other folk there would be limits?

    Dan.

  • Right to bear arms in Chelemby   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Thats is a good question...

    Ivinian culture (including Chelemby) is fundamentally different to feudal society. Their society is inherently a collection of clans; ultimate authority tends to be given to a person's clanhead (Valhakkar) rather than a centralised government under a king.

    An Ivinian Kingdom is a collection of independant clans under the influence of the most powerfull clan. If a clan is strong enough, it can demand tribute from lesser clans (often with implied threat of force), naturally if the clan objects, there could be raids, skirmishes, piracy, war etc. A kingdom is run in a very similar fashion to a clan (with tributory clans) albeit on a substantially larger scale.

    The actual structure of an Ivinian Kingdom can be rather fluid, particularly compared to the rigid formal sub-infeudination of a feudal kingdom. The big difference is that there is no formal obligation, a tributory clan doesn't have a formal requirement to provide military support to his overlord; if he doesn't provide support, there will be repercussions (usually violent in nature) from his overlord, providing of course he survives his current military problem and still has military domininace of the tributary clan.

    This is roughly my take on Chelemby...

    The Valhakkar is the ultimate authority in his lands. Noone, not even the king can tell him what to do on his land. Although there may be political, legal and other ramifications if his decisions impact on other Tia-Nalari clans. The right to carry weapons/armour etc is purely at the descretion of your Valhakkar.

    Note: In Ivinian society, I take bearing arms to be carrying weapons and armour that can not legitmately be considered purely for self defence (eg: Handaxe, Shorkana, Dagger, Leather Armour etc).

    Off the clan's direct holdings it varies somewhat. If you are on another clan's land, it is at the discretion of that Valhakkar; if you are under the protection of a Tia-Nalari clan and have some peacefull legitmate reason to carry arms, you are generally ok. If you don't have the protection of a Tia-Nalari clan, you will likely be asked some rather difficult questions.

    Legally, unless you are under the protection of a Tia-Nalari clan (either a member of, or have the patronage of a Tia-Nalari clan), you are pretty much fair game for anyone who does. Basically you are at the descretion of every Tia-Nalari clansmen you come accross; most of whom will generally take exception to people being excessively armed unless there is some significant reason for you to carry weapons. (eg: body guard, caravan guard etc)

    In any case, a clansmen's actions whilst on other lands will directly reflect their clan and valhakkar. If you cause problems, it causes problems with your clan; your valhakkar or his representatives will likely deal with it as they see fit.

    One exception to this may be the regular military, who have right to carry arms regardless of their origin. Their behaviour reflects on their superiors and ultimately the King and Queen; interestingly, their behaviour may also reflect on their Tia-Nalari clan (if any)

    An interesting question mark is the fighting orders attached to Agrikan and the Laranian orders in Chelemby. Do they:

    1.Have special legal status to carry weapons? (effectly the religious order acts like a quasi Tia-Nalari clan) or

    2. Would their right to carry weapons be inherited from a member's Tia Nalari clan?

    If it is the former, then it is a viable means for non Tia-Nalari clansmen (and their clients) to carry arms.

    If it is the second case, does it make the Tia-Nalari clan's Valhakkar more important than his religious superiors??

    I suspect that it has never been clearly defined (after all religious fighting orders are a relatively new concept brought in with Larani and Agrikan worship); both may be valid in various mixes according to the individual situation. (which could make things very interesting)

    I hope this helps...

  • Right to bear arms in Chelemby   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Thats is a good question...

    Ivinian culture (including Chelemby) is fundamentally different to feudal society. Their society is inherently a collection of clans; ultimate authority tends to be given to a person's clanhead (Valhakkar) rather than a centralised government under a king.

    An Ivinian Kingdom is a collection of independant clans under the influence of the most powerfull clan. If a clan is strong enough, it can demand tribute from lesser clans (often with implied threat of force), naturally if the clan objects, there could be raids, skirmishes, piracy, war etc. A kingdom is run in a very similar fashion to a clan (with tributory clans) albeit on a substantially larger scale.

    The actual structure of an Ivinian Kingdom can be rather fluid, particularly compared to the rigid formal sub-infeudination of a feudal kingdom. The big difference is that there is no formal obligation, a tributory clan doesn't have a formal requirement to provide military support to his overlord; if he doesn't provide support, there will be repercussions (usually violent in nature) from his overlord, providing of course he survives his current military problem and still has military domininace of the tributary clan.

    This is roughly my take on Chelemby...

    The Valhakkar is the ultimate authority in his lands. Noone, not even the king can tell him what to do on his land. Although there may be political, legal and other ramifications if his decisions impact on other Tia-Nalari clans. The right to carry weapons/armour etc is purely at the descretion of your Valhakkar.

    Note: In Ivinian society, I take bearing arms to be carrying weapons and armour that can not legitmately be considered purely for self defence (eg: Handaxe, Shorkana, Dagger, Leather Armour etc).

    Off the clan's direct holdings it varies somewhat. If you are on another clan's land, it is at the discretion of that Valhakkar; if you are under the protection of a Tia-Nalari clan and have some peacefull legitmate reason to carry arms, you are generally ok. If you don't have the protection of a Tia-Nalari clan, you will likely be asked some rather difficult questions.

    Legally, unless you are under the protection of a Tia-Nalari clan (either a member of, or have the patronage of a Tia-Nalari clan), you are pretty much fair game for anyone who does. Basically you are at the descretion of every Tia-Nalari clansmen you come accross; most of whom will generally take exception to people being excessively armed unless there is some significant reason for you to carry weapons. (eg: body guard, caravan guard etc)

    In any case, a clansmen's actions whilst on other lands will directly reflect their clan and valhakkar. If you cause problems, it causes problems with your clan; your valhakkar or his representatives will likely deal with it as they see fit.

    One exception to this may be the regular military, who have right to carry arms regardless of their origin. Their behaviour reflects on their superiors and ultimately the King and Queen; interestingly, their behaviour may also reflect on their Tia-Nalari clan (if any)

    An interesting question mark is the fighting orders attached to Agrikan and the Laranian orders in Chelemby. Do they:

    1.Have special legal status to carry weapons? (effectly the religious order acts like a quasi Tia-Nalari clan) or

    2. Would their right to carry weapons be inherited from a member's Tia Nalari clan?

    If it is the former, then it is a viable means for non Tia-Nalari clansmen (and their clients) to carry arms.

    If it is the second case, does it make the Tia-Nalari clan's Valhakkar more important than his religious superiors??

    I suspect that it has never been clearly defined (after all religious fighting orders are a relatively new concept brought in with Larani and Agrikan worship); both may be valid in various mixes according to the individual situation. (which could make things very interesting)

    I hope this helps...

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    . . . especially when you consider the Panaga trilogy or 100 Bushels of Rye. 100 Bushels of Rye was set more than halfway through 720, but its events had no real impact on the timeline. Even the Panaga trilogy, which was epic in scope, didn't really impact the timeline too much unless the GM *allowed* it to do so (which would be, of course, his or her privilege).

    Harn:Bloodline? Google-time . . . what a shame. I'd have loved to play a CRPG on Harn!

    ----------

    Old style heraldry: Sable, the pale argent.

    New style heraldry: Oreo, resting on edge.

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    . . . especially when you consider the Panaga trilogy or 100 Bushels of Rye. 100 Bushels of Rye was set more than halfway through 720, but its events had no real impact on the timeline. Even the Panaga trilogy, which was epic in scope, didn't really impact the timeline too much unless the GM *allowed* it to do so (which would be, of course, his or her privilege).

    Harn:Bloodline? Google-time . . . what a shame. I'd have loved to play a CRPG on Harn!

    ----------

    Old style heraldry: Sable, the pale argent.

    New style heraldry: Oreo, resting on edge.

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Well, the 'canon year' is tr720. I have always insisted on this. All of my environmental material has always been a 'snapshot' of (my canon) Kèthîra in tr720.

    However, Allan is right in that when it comes to adventures, the bets are off; and this includes electronic content, computer games, etc.

    By definition these kinds of product must be allowed more licence, because they are presumed to be 'action' undertaken in the course of play. They have to be based on my canon 'snapshot', but in theory, they can do whatever they like as long as they don't rewrite the snapshot itself by changing pre-tr720 events.

    There are even cases in which we tinkered a bit with the pre-tr720 canon, as in Hârn:Bloodline which I wrote with Cameron Brown. Hârn:Bloodline had a wonderful 'backstory' stretching back to tr100 and gave players the ability to 'shape' early history... possibly even having the whole world destroyed before tr720... computer games are, perhaps a special case; it stands to reason that, if we let you fight a battle in the past, (or step on butterflies for that matter) you may well change the present (in fact I don't see how you could avoid it).

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Well, the 'canon year' is tr720. I have always insisted on this. All of my environmental material has always been a 'snapshot' of (my canon) Kèthîra in tr720.

    However, Allan is right in that when it comes to adventures, the bets are off; and this includes electronic content, computer games, etc.

    By definition these kinds of product must be allowed more licence, because they are presumed to be 'action' undertaken in the course of play. They have to be based on my canon 'snapshot', but in theory, they can do whatever they like as long as they don't rewrite the snapshot itself by changing pre-tr720 events.

    There are even cases in which we tinkered a bit with the pre-tr720 canon, as in Hârn:Bloodline which I wrote with Cameron Brown. Hârn:Bloodline had a wonderful 'backstory' stretching back to tr100 and gave players the ability to 'shape' early history... possibly even having the whole world destroyed before tr720... computer games are, perhaps a special case; it stands to reason that, if we let you fight a battle in the past, (or step on butterflies for that matter) you may well change the present (in fact I don't see how you could avoid it).

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    I always thought published material could go beyond 720, so long as it did not change any canon, at least in a major way. So they could publish adventures, but not were the King of Kanday dies etc.

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    I always thought published material could go beyond 720, so long as it did not change any canon, at least in a major way. So they could publish adventures, but not were the King of Kanday dies etc.

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    So Auran had a deal worked out in which they were going to be permitted to violate the original, cast-in-stone idea of *NEVER* advancing the Kethiran timeline past 720 T.R.? Boo, hiss . . .

    ----------

    Old-style heraldry: Sable, the pale argent.

    New-style heraldry: Oreo, resting on edge.

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    So Auran had a deal worked out in which they were going to be permitted to violate the original, cast-in-stone idea of *NEVER* advancing the Kethiran timeline past 720 T.R.? Boo, hiss . . .

    ----------

    Old-style heraldry: Sable, the pale argent.

    New-style heraldry: Oreo, resting on edge.

  • Moving material to new computer   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Yes they still open on the old computer, and no, different versions of acrobat. Newer on the new machine. I thought it might be the memory stick, as its also old, I shall have to try an open them from the stick and see if that works. I left it at home, so later today.
    Thanks

  • Moving material to new computer   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Yes they still open on the old computer, and no, different versions of acrobat. Newer on the new machine. I thought it might be the memory stick, as its also old, I shall have to try an open them from the stick and see if that works. I left it at home, so later today.
    Thanks

  • Moving material to new computer   10 years 49 weeks ago

    ok... my first questions would be: (1) do the files still open on the old computer? and (2) is the same version of acrobat/reader installed on both computers? :)

  • Moving material to new computer   10 years 49 weeks ago

    ok... my first questions would be: (1) do the files still open on the old computer? and (2) is the same version of acrobat/reader installed on both computers? :)

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Yeh man, thats what Im talking about. That reminds me of some classic Traveler 3 part adventures. They were exiting to read as a ref, let alone put player through. No chance the sequels will ever see the light of day?
    There is a d20 series put out by Forever People Digital (?), called Opus. The series started with no source books or world books, just adventures. The adventures are the vehicle to teach the ref and players about the setting. What a great idea, no hours of pre-game time spend by the ref on reading the setting, and then trying to impart that cool knowledge to the players. How do you prep new players to a setting in an engaging manner without boring them? Handouts and hope they read them, monologue speel before, during and after the game, or learning about it on there feet, in game. I dont play d20, but Opus sure sounds interesting.
    Nice to hear from you Keith. You must be due a holiday to Darwin soon and bring those notes with you.
    Allan

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Yeh man, thats what Im talking about. That reminds me of some classic Traveler 3 part adventures. They were exiting to read as a ref, let alone put player through. No chance the sequels will ever see the light of day?
    There is a d20 series put out by Forever People Digital (?), called Opus. The series started with no source books or world books, just adventures. The adventures are the vehicle to teach the ref and players about the setting. What a great idea, no hours of pre-game time spend by the ref on reading the setting, and then trying to impart that cool knowledge to the players. How do you prep new players to a setting in an engaging manner without boring them? Handouts and hope they read them, monologue speel before, during and after the game, or learning about it on there feet, in game. I dont play d20, but Opus sure sounds interesting.
    Nice to hear from you Keith. You must be due a holiday to Darwin soon and bring those notes with you.
    Allan

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Ken is quite correct, WotW did not introduce a new Goddess into the Pantheon. A cult had arisen that followed the orders of a woman who heard voices from beyond.

    WotW was written as the first installment of a 12 part series called the Tapestry Saga, intended to span 20 years. Most of the adventures were to centre around an overarching plot-line that followed the rise of this new cult. However there were to be four adventures that had nothing to do with the main adventure butwere still intended for the same characters following the central campaign. If characters died, it was easy to bring in relatives and friends of the central cast to continue the main storyline.

    The overarching plot was fully sketched out and the theme of all 12 episodes summarised. The first three adventures were written in detail. The plot-line was not provided in total in WotW as it was decided to provide information to the GM on a needs to know basis, at thae start. Once more of the plot-line began to have real impact on the game (around episode 6)GMs would be able to purchase a special background booklet from Columbia that fleshed out everything. This product was not going to be available in shops and the Columbia site was to advertise this as a 'secret' reference book for GM's of the Tapestry Series only. Of course, asa marketing tool, it was envisaged that many Harniacs, not playing the campaign would like to purchase this just to see what the secrets of the game where!

    Sadly, Auran's relationship with Columbia broke down and the Tapestry Series was shelved after the introductory module. Some basic elements of the second module (the mystery at the monastery, the voyage etc) were used in the Auran d20 "Dark Awakenings" modules, although the fantasy element was ramped up.

    Regards,

    Keith

  • Campaign   10 years 49 weeks ago

    Ken is quite correct, WotW did not introduce a new Goddess into the Pantheon. A cult had arisen that followed the orders of a woman who heard voices from beyond.

    WotW was written as the first installment of a 12 part series called the Tapestry Saga, intended to span 20 years. Most of the adventures were to centre around an overarching plot-line that followed the rise of this new cult. However there were to be four adventures that had nothing to do with the main adventure butwere still intended for the same characters following the central campaign. If characters died, it was easy to bring in relatives and friends of the central cast to continue the main storyline.

    The overarching plot was fully sketched out and the theme of all 12 episodes summarised. The first three adventures were written in detail. The plot-line was not provided in total in WotW as it was decided to provide information to the GM on a needs to know basis, at thae start. Once more of the plot-line began to have real impact on the game (around episode 6)GMs would be able to purchase a special background booklet from Columbia that fleshed out everything. This product was not going to be available in shops and the Columbia site was to advertise this as a 'secret' reference book for GM's of the Tapestry Series only. Of course, asa marketing tool, it was envisaged that many Harniacs, not playing the campaign would like to purchase this just to see what the secrets of the game where!

    Sadly, Auran's relationship with Columbia broke down and the Tapestry Series was shelved after the introductory module. Some basic elements of the second module (the mystery at the monastery, the voyage etc) were used in the Auran d20 "Dark Awakenings" modules, although the fantasy element was ramped up.

    Regards,

    Keith

  • House Rules   10 years 49 weeks ago

    my vote would be for downloads..

    :)

  • House Rules   10 years 49 weeks ago

    my vote would be for downloads..

    :)


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