Shorkyne Civil War

Jessee's picture

Howdy,

Working on a game based on a Civil War in Shorkyne. The design objective for these rules is to provide an easy-to-play boardgame that can be played independently, or can be used as the basis for tabletop miniature figure battles.

Here's my first cut at the map. The mapboard is a stylized representation of Kelestia Production’s Kingdom of Shorkyne. The board is divided into provinces, and some provinces are further subdivided to individual hexes. Hexes are either land or sea, land hexes adjacent to the sea are coastal hexes.

Suggestions welcome. More to come ...

Ponder on,

Jessee A. Scarborough
Frederick, MD, US

AttachmentSize
Image icon Shorkyne Civil War Map2.26 MB
Lawrence W. Thrasher Jr's picture

I'm loving your idea for a Shorkanie civil war as your political backdrop and I like the way you've put your map together. I have a few questions that you've managed to inspire within my miniatures loving heart.

1. What miniatures set of rules do you envision using?
2. Have you worked out your strategic movement rules yet and are you going to consider weather effects?
3. What about Naval Matters? Are you envisioning any consideration of that?
4. Are you considering using Blocks like in other CGI wargames for strategic movement and combat?
5. And last, but certainly not least, random events (like coastal raids, uprisings, and/or pressure from Trierzon).

I used to run naval miniatures (1905 to 1945 era) games using the four original regional maps. It just so happened that N.R. Crosby's original map scale of 12.5 miles, 5 Harnic Leagues, or "about" 20 kilometers was also exactly 11 nautical miles or 22,000 yards, lending the maps very nicely to naval miniatures games. KP's layered mapping system is even better for naval miniatures, but it came out later.

Jessee's picture

Howdy,

Each of your questions, with my reply.

1. What miniatures set of rules do you envision using?

JAS: Using the historical miniatures rules, "So Convenient for Hewing" which I published in 2020. These rules are available print on demand from lulu.com (search the site by the title of the rules).

2. Have you worked out your strategic movement rules yet and are you going to consider weather effects?

JAS: There are five types of units in the game:

1. [b]Household troops/knights[/b] are professional soldiers. Veteran troops on the tabletop. They are typically mounted; however, infantry may be fielded as household troops. These troops may move from province to province on the game board. Household troops cost 4 gold to build per Table 3.

2. [b]Foot[/b] are soldiers with some training and are generally uniformly equipped. Such foot troops typically act as Garrison troops, and are regular/warriors on the tabletop. They are typically foot troops but can include cavalry. Garrison troops cost 2 gold to build per Table 3.

3. [b]Scouts[/b] are irregulars, not uniformly equipped, and may be soldiers with some training, and are often mounted. They are used as light troops, and are regular/warriors on the table top. Scouts cost 1 gold to build per Table 3.

4. [b]Settlers/militia[/b] (levied troops) are soldiers from the general population. They are counted as green troops on the tabletop. Settler may move from province to province, and are required to conduct a harvest, or build and improve cities/castles. Settlers cost 1 gold to build per Table 3.

5. [b]Ships[/b] represent warships and merchant ships used to conduct trade and move units over water. Ships cost 4 gold to build, and may move up to six areas per Table 3.

The above text an excerpt from my in progress outline. Table 3 not included here. Knights, Foot and Scouts may move up to two hexes. Levies move 1 hex, and ships move 6 hexes. Movement may be halted when attempting to cross a hex side. Depending on the type of hexside (road, open, or restricted on land) or sea, and the results of a d6 die roll. Sea hex sides typically as "road" but as "open" during the winter, stormy, season.

3. What about Naval Matters? Are you envisioning any consideration of that?

JAS: Yes, see No. 2 above. There are also advantage cards which can modify actions in the game. One of those cards is envisioned as "Naval Superiority." The "Naval Superiority" card allows attacks to ignore defenses, or allow retreat from combat by ship. Retreating by ship, would not normally be allowed. In addition, the presence of a ship in a coastal hex makes the province more likely to generate "wealth." "Wealth" not further elaborated here, at this time.

4. Are you considering using Blocks like in other CGI wargames for strategic movement and combat?

JAS, No, not a block game.

5. And last, but certainly not least, random events (like coastal raids, uprisings, and/or pressure from Trierzon).

JAS: As mentioned above, there are advantage cards. Raiding is one of actions allowed on a turn. In addition, the province cards allow potential treachery by supposedly allied lords.

This is still a work in progress. I started working on these concepts a couple of years ago for conceptual game with the working title of "The Boot and the Ball," which focused on Norman actions (as well as Lombard, Byzantine, and Saracen factions) in 11th century Italy and Sicily.

My current plan is to complete my rules outline, create the cards and game markers and then playtest as a boardgame. Followed by a redux as the basis for a miniatures campaign.

More to come...

Ponder on,

JAS